“Once you look at the unemployment numbers of those out of work a year or more, those underemployed, and those who had given up on the job search a different picture of higher employment emerges.”

recessionThe recession is over, right? Maybe not. There has been plenty of talk about unemployment in the US being under 6%. The share of the long-term unemployed in the United States — as defined as people looking for work for at least six months — is falling as a recovery takes hold. But is that number real?

Once you look at the unemployment numbers of those out of work a year or more, those underemployed, and those who had given up on the job search a different picture of higher employment emerges. “The U-6 rate was flat in May at 10.8 percent… The U-6 rate has held firm in the double digits since June 2008. It most recently peaked at 17.1 percent in April 2010.”

Countries around the world face similar problems and compete globally to bring jobs to their country. We live in a global economy so what happens around the world affects us in the United States as well. The incentive for companies to move jobs offshore will continue to remain strong. Add to that the continued technological changes to increases productivity with fewer workers and the competition for jobs will continue to make the job search very competitive in the foreseeable future.

If you are unemployed there are important steps you can take to make sure you are competitive in today’s job market.

  • One, keep your skills up to date.
  • Two, be sure you have a marketing tolls that sells you clearly, concisely, professionally; your resume. There is no substitute as your resume “travels” on its own. It’s the door opener, the interviewer “getter” and the “leave behind”. Learn how to quickly customize your resume to reflect each specific job you are applying for. “Cookie cutter” resumes just don’t make the grade. They don’t differentiate you.
  • Three, have a solid interview presentation. And, believe it or not, that doesn’t mean have preset answers. Learn how to decipher what the interviewer really wants and respond accordingly